Stop teenage dating abuse

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Prompt them to change passwords regularly, and willingly play the heavy later ("My parents made me change my password"). Teens often feel invincible and eager to explore the adult world.

Messages of risk and fear -- "Don't let this happen to you" -- are developmentally inappropriate. Know the red flags, but don't use them in conversations with your teen.

Also, don't be the parent who freaks out at the first mention of sex, underage drinking, or a fight erupting at a party.

You'll just teach them not to mention these issues to you. Teen dating violence is overwhelmingly connected to other kinds of attacks, even if you live in a "good neighborhood." Many victims are primarily assaulted by peers and acquaintances, while others also experience family violence.

Unhealthy relationships can start early and last a lifetime.

Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship.

According to new research by University of New Hampshire's Sherry Hamby, both aggressors and their victims have more than likely also experienced some form of domestic or sexual victimization. Teach your teens how to behave when dating by being respectful, egalitarian, and loving in your own relationships.

There are certain things you can do to prevent dating violence in your relationship as well as with people you care about.Some people doubt whether or not they are even in a violent dating situation and become confused by their relationship.Violence hotlines are an effective resource for getting help with your relationship and identifying possible violence or other abuse, according to the National Center for Victims of Crime.It can occur in person or electronically and might occur between a current or former dating partner. Healthy relationship behaviors can have a positive effect on a teen’s emotional development.Several different words are used to describe teen dating violence. Dating violence is widespread with serious long-term and short-term effects. Unhealthy, abusive, or violent relationships can have severe consequences and short- and long-term negative effects on a developing teen.

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